IMG 1114

Frequently asked questions

Technical

Accelerometers – like the piezoelectric sensors used in STRYDE – measure acceleration. Geophones measure velocity. The seismic data can be processed in either acceleration or velocity, and you can always choose your preferred domain, as the two units are easily convertible.

The frequency and phase response of the STRYDE sensor is flat between 1-125Hz. Sensitivity is 3.6V/g.

The STRYDE Node™ is the lightest node on the market by a factor of three. It weighs just 150g, and measures 129mm x 41mm.

Seismic deliverables are output from STRYDE systems in SEGD rev3 format. Software utilities are provided for ad hoc conversion to SEGY format, if required.

Discover more about our nodal technology

Buying and owning

At STRYDE, we offer flexible lease and purchasing options, and rapid delivery of equipment to companies across the globe, enabled by existing pools of node inventory located in our suite of global warehouses. So whether you are looking to test equipment in preparation for future land seismic surveys, or want to lease or purchase thousands of STRYDE Nodes™ for an upcoming survey - we can tailor our commercial model to suit your business needs, budget, and timescale.

When you buy a system it’s automatically covered by our one-year warranty.

Batteries and charging

It takes 4 hours to recharge a node that has a completely depleted battery.

Each battery cell is designed to last the lifetime of the node – the cells are qualified for hundreds of charge cycles without significant loss of capacity.

Typical autonomy is 28 days for nodes that are acquiring data continuously, or 45 days for nodes acquiring data for 12 hours per day. Range+ has a node autonomy of 50 days with continuous recording.

The number of Nests (STRYDE's charge and harvesting hardware) controls how many nodes you can charge and harvest simultaneously. Each Nest has a capacity of 90 nodes. The largest STRYDE systems have 36 Nests, and can simultaneously charge and harvest data from 3,240 nodes at the same time.

Using the system

For optimum performance, we recommend burying the nodes in the earth so that they are entirely covered with soil. In wet ground, this burying method may be detrimental to the synchronization of the oscillator with GNSS time. STRYDE can advise on burying levels for your particular project, depending on your imaging objectives. If burying the node isn't an option, we have easy to attach spikes of various lengths, baseplates and other options to choose from. We will always help you to select the best solution for each specific project.

STRYDE Nodes™ can be interrogated in the field to display and log QC information such as recording state, battery level, memory usage and GNSS performance, which can be analysed in camp to enable effective spread management.

The simplicity of the STRYDE deployment and retrieval workflow means that your field crew don't need to have any seismic experience. Language isn't a barrier either - our Navigator software is multilingual and exceptionally intuitive to use. This means novice field crew can be trained in a matter of hours.

The charging and harvesting system requires more expertise to operate. Full instruction will be given in a short training course that is tailored to your experience with seismic and project requirements.

The optical link is extremely robust – scratches on the cap don’t affect the quality of the data transfer. You simply need to clean any dirt from the nodes before loading into Nests for harvesting.

The STRYDE Navigator Tablet application guides operators to the position at which nodes are deployed. When the nodes are being buried it is common to use biodegradable paint, a pin flag or a short length of tape (attached to the node or nearby object) to mark the location where it was buried. In some environments (e.g. deep snow or sand dunes) nodes can be attached to a rope before burial to enable easy location and retrieval.

The STRYDE system is compatible with all seismic source types, both vibroseis and impulsive, including surveys that use a mixture of source types. Source times and positions are loaded and QC'ed in the STRYDE system (along with sweep information for vibroseis shots) and used to generate shot records. Both raw and correlated vibroseis records can be output. Continuous seismic records can also be output, e.g. for use in microseismic studies.

Yes – the system will generate receiver and shot gather deliverables as soon as the node data needed to create those deliverables has been harvested. The system includes QC software for viewing deliverables in the field.

Our system has enabled over 220 seismic surveys on land, in 50+ countries to date; across a range of terrains (desert, tundra, mountains, foothills etc) and application areas. Our clients range from seismic acquisition contractors and oil and gas operators, to academics and geothermal operators. Explore our case studies to gain insight into our client's experiences when using the STRYDE system.

The STRYDE system has been successfully used in snow, deserts, urban areas, farmland, forests, jungles and roadsides as well as rocky, mountainous terrain and foothills.

Technical papers

Gain expert insights from technical papers written by our team of experts...

Unlocking ultra-high-density for CCUS applications

Unlocking ultra-high-density for CCUS applications

Land seismic recording systems in a changing world - a 2021 review

Land seismic recording systems in a changing world - a 2021 review

Active and passive 3D seismic survey around the Scrovegni Chapel using autonomous nodes

Active and passive 3D seismic survey around the Scrovegni Chapel using autonomous nodes

Game-changing nodes enable high-density seismic for any industry

Game-changing nodes enable high-density seismic for any industry

The case for a nimble Node, towards a new land seismic receiver system with unlimited channels

The case for a nimble Node, towards a new land seismic receiver system with unlimited channels

A Comparative Field Trial of a New Nimble Node and Cabled Systems in a Desert Environment

A Comparative Field Trial of a New Nimble Node and Cabled Systems in a Desert Environment

Processing and Analysis Results of the First 3D Nimble Node Survey; West Siberia, Russia

Processing and Analysis Results of the First 3D Nimble Node Survey; West Siberia, Russia

Acquisition of an Ultra High Density 3D Seismic Survey Using New Nimble Nodes, Onshore Abu Dhabi

Acquisition of an Ultra High Density 3D Seismic Survey Using New Nimble Nodes, Onshore Abu Dhabi

Ultra-high density land nodal seismic - processing challenges and rewards

Ultra-high density land nodal seismic - processing challenges and rewards

Seismic acquisition in western Siberia - a comparison between conventional cabled receiver arrays and lightweight autonomous nodes

Seismic acquisition in western Siberia - a comparison between conventional cabled receiver arrays and lightweight autonomous nodes

Which sensor for land nodal seismic: recording acceleration or velocity?

Which sensor for land nodal seismic: recording acceleration or velocity?